Blog

Should you consider a heart scan after having COVID-19?

As a result of new information regarding the relationship between the cardiovascular system and COVID-19, there’s been a lot of chatter around the question of should you consider a heart scan after recovering? Answers vary depending on the individual and the severity of their stint with the virus.

Raising Concern Over Abnormal Symptoms Led to a Life-saving Finding

In 2010, about two weeks before his hospitalization, Albert Gonzales began feeling dizzy during walks with his wife. These dizzy spells were incapacitating, requiring Albert to stop and sit down to catch his breath. He also noticed an uptick in his weight, gaining 20 pounds, with no change to his diet or exercise routine.

Heart Procedure Makes a ‘Night and Day’ Difference for Albuquerque Man

In 2017, Jim B. came home from work one evening and complained to his wife that he was feeling awful. Even without feeling common heart attack symptoms such as chest pain or tingling in his arms, for some reason, Jim believed he was experiencing a heart attack. He rushed to a hospital in downtown Albuquerque where his theory was confirmed, and doctors explained he would need to have two stents inserted.

Heart Disease from Both Sides: A Husband and Wife's Perspective

The Husband’s Perspective:

“I’m going to die!” Those were the words that raced through my mind in October 2019 when I heard Dr. Raymond Yau tell me, “you’re going to need a double by-pass,” while I was on the operating table going through angioplasty.

First Responders PSA: Do Not Drive To The ER

Heart attacks are often portrayed with dramatic flair – someone clutching their chest and falling to the ground. While chest pain is a symptom of a heart attack, there are several other symptoms that indicate someone is having a cardiac episode.

What role does exercise play in heart health?

The heart needs exercise just like any other muscle.

Exercise helps the heart pump blood efficiently through the body with little strain. Regular exercise also helps to keep arteries and other blood vessels flexible, ensuring good blood flow and normal blood pressure.

According to the American Heart Association, for each hour of regular exercise you get, you’ll gain about two hours of additional life expectancy. In addition to strengthening your heart and preventing heart disease, consistent physical activity is also important for:

Handling the holidays with a heart condition

The holidays can be dangerous, especially for those who have heart disease. Overindulging at meals, skipping physical activity, and letting stress get out of control can put a strain on your heart, sometimes leading to serious problems.

Maintaining healthy habits through the holidays is a challenge, but it is important, especially for those with preexisting heart conditions and high blood pressure. Here’s what you can do to protect your heart this holiday season:

Give yourself the gift of a heart scan this holiday season

An important heart screening may the perfect holiday gift for you or a loved one.

The Heart Scan offered by the Heart Hospital of New Mexico at Lovelace Medical Center, in conjunction with New Mexico Heart Institute, is the most accurate screening tool for identifying heart disease.

The Heart Scan, also known as a coronary calcium scan, can help your doctor get a better understanding of your risk of heart disease, and can detect and measure calcium-containing plaque in the arteries.

Diabetes and Heart Disease

Did you know that there is a link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease? Diabetes can affect many major organs in your body, including the heart. Diabetes is one of the major risk factors associated with heart disease.

Having diabetes means you are more likely to develop heart disease and to have a greater chance of a heart attack or a stroke. High levels of glucose in your blood can damage the walls of your arteries and make them more likely to develop fatty deposits, which may block the arteries that supply oxygen-rich blood to your heart or brain.

The Link between Atrial Fibrillation and Family History

Is atrial fibrillation genetic? It can be.

Atrial fibrillation, also known as AFib, can happen to anyone. Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart irregularity, or cardiac arrhythmia. More than 2.5 million Americans have atrial fibrillation.

Having relatives with AFib can increase your chances of being diagnosed. Atrial fibrillation that is inherited is called familial atrial fibrillation.

Recent studies suggest that up to 30 percent of people living with AFib have a relative with the condition.